Archives

Fossil Day

Bring fossils for expert identification, view special exhibits, and participate in a museum hunt for prizes and hands-on activities relating

WV Day at the Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex

Celebrate West Virginia's 155th Birthday at the Grave Creek Mound and learn about how the Native people of the state.

Lecture – East Liverpool Potters Southbound to West Virginia

By Susan Weaver, Director, The Museum of Ceramics, East Liverpool, OH As East Liverpool ran out of riverfront land, enterprising potters crossed the Ohio to the “Southside” to expand or start potteries. Harker Pottery, Taylor, Smith & Taylor, Edwin M. Knowles, and Homer Laughlin China Company all moved south into what would become the towns of Chester and Newell.

Garden Planting Day at the Grave Creek Mound

Join the Grave Creek Mound in planting their Interpretive Garden. See the types of plants and vegetables that the Native peoples would have grown for their everyday use.

Dineh Tah’ Navajo Dancers

As part of a nationwide tour, the Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex will host the Dineh Tah’ Navajo Dancers on Saturday, April 7 at 1 p.m. The Dineh Tah’ Navajo Dancers are touring the country in recognition of the 150th anniversary of the Treaty Between the United States of America and the Navajo Tribe of Indians. The treaty was signed June 1, 1868, ratified by the U.S. Senate July 25, 1868, and proclaimed by President Johnson on Aug. 12, 1868. The group will perform traditional Navajo dances and songs - all part of the rich cultural traditions of the Navajo “Dineh” People. The program is free and open to the public

36th Annual Marshall County Art Show at the Grave Creek Mound

The 36th Annual Marshall County Student Art Show at the Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex will open on Saturday, March 17 with an Opening Reception from 2 p.m. - 4 p.m. The show is organized and installed by members of the Cameron High School Art Club, with art teacher Amanda Jenree as their advisor. It will be open to the public during regular museum hours through Saturday, April 7. It is a competitive exhibition for Middle and High School students in Marshall County, and the entries are judged and awarded ribbons in several categories. One award is the “People’s Choice” award, which is determined during the Opening Reception, when attendees can vote for their favorite Middle School and High School entry.

Fossil Day

B. Mitchel Blake, Jr., State Geologist and Director of the West Virginia Geological and Economical Survey, will identify your fossils. There will also be hands-on activities for the whole family, a museum hunt, and a special display of fossils by members of the West Virginia Fossil Club.

Film Series at the Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex

Film- "The Real George Washington"(50 min): Celebrate George Washington's birthday on February 22, 1732, with this film that reveals the man behind the myth. Join an excavation team at Washington's childhood home, and see how a team of forensic scientists and artists recreate a realistic image of Washington's face. A National Geographic production.

Film – “The Real George Washington”

Celebrate George Washington’s Birthday (February 22, 1732) with this National Geographic film that reveals the man behind the myth. Join an excavation team at Washington’s childhood home, and see how a team of forensic scientists and artists recreate a realistic image of Washington’s face. (50 min).

Film – “Prince Among Slaves”

“Prince Among Slaves” is the remarkable true story of Abdul Rahman Ibrahima Sori, an African prince enslaved in the American South who endured the humiliation of slavery without ever losing his dignity or hope for freedom. A PBS production. (60 min).

Family Program at the Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex

Green up your winter blues! Beat the winter blues with some garden-related activities! Help us shell beans and shuck corn for the museums Interpretive Garden, make a cornhusk doll, propogate a baby plant, and get garden advice from a Master Gardener.

Native American Heritage Month Lecture: “It’s All About Stuff”

Thursday, November 30, 7:00 pm Native American Heritage Month Lecture: “It’s All About Stuff” By Todd “Ghost in the Head” Johnson This program examines how the introduction of trade goods that greatly changed Eastern Woodland cultures after the introduction of European “stuff”. Mr. Johnson draws from the traditions of his Huron heritage when presenting his programs about Eastern Woodland lifeways. He has been a consultant and presenter at historic sites such as Fort Necessity National Battlefield and Meadowcroft Rock Shelter and Historic Village, and has received two letters of recognition from the United States Congress for his portrayal of Huron heritage.

Vietnam: West Virginians Remember

On Veterans Day, Saturday, Nov. 11, the Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex will show a documentary from West Virginia Public Broadcasting featuring the experiences of 5 West Virginia combat veterans. Per capita, West Virginians served the most and died the most in Vietnam. It lives on as America’s most controversial war – with questions unanswered, lessons not learned, and for veterans who survive, including thousands of West Virginians, haunting memories remain.

Archaeology Month Lecture: “Ancient Earthworks in the Middle Ohio Valley: Discovering New Sites and Re-examining the Old”

Archaeology Month Lecture: “Ancient Earthworks in the Middle Ohio Valley: Discovering New Sites and Re-examining the Old” By Jarrod Burks, PhD, Director of Archaeological Geophysics, Ohio Valley Archaeology, Inc. The Middle Ohio Valley is rich in ancient moments--circles, squares, and even more exotic shapes; most were built about 1800 years ago. Recent aerial photograph analysis and on-the-ground geophysical surveys have found a surprising number of previously undocumented enclosure sites, as well as many new features at well-known sites.

Lecture: Ancient Earthworks in the Middle Ohio Valley

Ancient Earthworks in the Middle Ohio Valley: Discovering New Sites and Re-examining the Old By Jarrod Burks, PhD, Director of Archaeological Geophysics, Ohio Valley Archaeology, Inc. The Middle Ohio Valley is rich in ancient moments--circles, squares, and even more exotic shapes; most were built about 1800 years ago. Though many sites were mapped in the 19th century and still more mounds were excavated, these may be the tip of the proverbial iceberg. Recent aerial photograph analysis and on-the-ground geophysical surveys have found a surprising number of previously undocumented enclosure sites, as well as many new features at well-known sites. Join us as we explore these new discoveries and see first-hand some of the exciting new scientific data that is leading scholars into a new era of earthwork research in our region.

International Archaeology Day

International Archaeology Day Saturday, October 21, 1:00 and 3:00 pm View “Vampire Legend”, part of the PBS “Secrets of the Dead” series and find out how Medieval burials in England offer insight into the creation of the vampire myth. (60 min)

Film – “America Before Columbus”

When Christopher Columbus stepped ashore in the New World, he actually encountered a very old world whose inhabitants had created a vast infrastructure of cities, orchards, canals, and causeways. This National Geographic production sheds light on the world of ancient American history.

25th Annual Archaeology Day

25th Annual Archaeology Day Saturday, October 7, 12:00 – 4:00 pm The 25th Annual Archaeology Day features special exhibits, demonstrations, and activities for the whole family. These include behind-the-scenes tours of the Archaeological Research Facility, flint knapping demonstrations, atlatl throwing (weather permitting), a museum scavenger hunt, displays and demonstrations by professional archaeologists and volunteers, hands-on activities, and more.

Lecture – “Hopewell Geometry, Astronomy, and the Marietta Earthworks”

By Wesley Clarke, MA, RPA - The Castle Museum in Marietta, OH. The earthworks at Marietta, Ohio, includes several unusual features, as well as astronomical alignments. While systematic examination of this site has been limited, research during the past 25 years has added substantially to the site record, pointing to future avenues of inquiry and explanation. Mr. Clarke is currently the resident archaeologist and Manager of Collections at The Castle Museum in Marietta, Ohio, where he is directing excavation of an early nineteenth century pottery production site on the museum grounds.

Museum Day Live!

Museum Day Live! Saturday, September 23, 12:00 – 4:00 pm Pick up an Interpretive Garden check-list and learn about the plants growing in the garden.

Fossil Day

Fossil Day Saturday, September 16, 12:00 – 4:00 pm Bring your fossils for expert identification by Dr. Ronald Mc Dowell, Senior Research Geologist and Head of the Geoscience Section of the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey (WVGES). Family-oriented activities include finding a fossil, craft activities, and a film. Also, visit our display at the Elizabethtown Festival at the old West Virginia Penitentiary and stop at the Fall Festival on Jefferson Avenue.

“Ice Age Death Trap: Uncovering Mammoths, Mastodons, and Other Vanished Beasts”

A large number of 100,000 - year old fossils discovered during construction at a Colorado ski resort provide scientists with clues to some of North America’s most interesting prehistoric creatures. Stop at the Discovery Table and make a hand-held fan featuring a picture of one of these Ice Age creatures.

Pirate Day – “Secrets of the Dead: Blackbeard’s Lost Ship”

We will be showing a film about the pirate know as Blackbeard, "Secrets of the Dead: Blackbeard’s Lost Ship” (60 min). The most infamous pirate of his day, Blackbeard inspired fear in all who crossed his path. 300 years later, his flag ship, the Queen Anne’s Revenge, is being excavated by a group of marine archaeologists. His story is revealed by careful preservation and analysis of the ship’s remains, including cannons, guns, anchors, and even gold. Did you know that the Upper Ohio River Valley was plagued by pirates as well? See the front of this flyer for “Pirate Day” activities held today.

West Virginia Day

Celebrate West Virginia’s founding in 1863 with special family-oriented crafts, museum hunt, and an all-day showing of “West Virginia: A Film History”, a 6 ½ - hour documentary series produced by the West Virginia History Film Project and the West Virginia Humanities Council. Stop in for an episode or two!

“Burning Springs – The Forgotten Story” By Storyteller Judi Tarowsky

“Burning Springs – The Forgotten Story” By Storyteller Judi Tarowsky On May 9, 1863, Confederate troops under General William (Grumble) Jones marched on Burning Springs, an oil boom town in what is today Wirt County, WV. The Confederate troops set fire to the oil field and the town, yet there is no Federal record of the incident, and no newspaper coverage. In effect, there was a cover-up of the incident. Find out what happened that fateful day in this program that includes 30 minutes of storytelling followed by time for questions-and-answers.

Lecture – “Early Native Americans in West Virginia: The Fort Ancient Culture”

Based on research for her book, Darla I. Spencer, Author and Registered Professional Archaeologist (RPA), of the same title, Ms. Spencer will present an illustrated summary of what is currently known about the Fort Ancient people in West Virginia. A book signing will follow the lecture.

Annual Planting of the Interpretive Garden

Help plant the garden and learn about the Three Sisters (corn, beans, and squash) who were planted together in many Native American gardens. There are also indoor activities – the program will take place rain or shine.

Lecture: “Beneath the Poppies and Crosses: What Archaeology Reveals about the First World War”

By Hank Lutton, Curator, Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex. April 2017 marks the centenary of the United States’ entry into the First World War. This program examines the recent contributions that archaeology has made to provide a better understanding of “The War to End All Wars.” Recent discoveries, including forensic evidence, are transforming our knowledge of how individual soldiers lived and died a century ago.

Lecture – “Beneath the Poppies and Crosses: What Archaeology Reveals about the First World War”

By Hank Lutton, Curator, Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex. April 2017 marks the centenary of the United States’ entry into the First World War. To observe the anniversary, this program examines the recent contributions that archaeology has made to better understand “the war to end all wars.” By highlighting battlefield excavations, personal artifacts, and the forensic analysis of the fallen from unmarked graves, this lecture will reveal recent discoveries that are transforming our knowledge of how individual soldiers lived and died a century ago.

Lecture – “Survey and Documentation of Hampshire County Cemeteries”

Lecture – “Survey and Documentation of Hampshire County Cemeteries” By Jamie Vosvick, West Virginia Office Manager & Supervising Archaeologist, Archaeological Consultants of the Midwest, Inc., focuses on how community involvement was instrumental in identifying cemeteries that have been forgotten and/or destroyed and are in danger of being lost. Find out how to save and protect these historic resources.